A note on finishing…

I love sewing. I have sewn for a long time, and I know lots of people who sew and take pride in their work.  I always love looking at the way things are completed and I am usually the one to fawn all over the finishing details.  I know I love it when that happens to me, so of course I love to share the “kudos” with others.  Today, I was sitting at my sewing machine during an impromptu rondezvous with some industrial seams,  and all I could think was “damn girl, do you think it might be over the top?”.  Of course I just had to laugh.    The finishing seamstress in me was already thinking on how to hand finish the seams down farther, so they looked flush with the quilted fabric.  Basically becoming invisible.  This is where the practical seamstress reared her pretty head.  The item in question is not Couture,  and using such techniques will devalue those items that are.  But man, did it take a lot to walk away.

I think the way an item is constructed tells alot about the designer.  The most talented artist can turn a dog food bag into a gorgeous skirt, a packing box into a corset, or polyester drapes into an evening gown.    The materials do not make the design, they only serve to enhance the product.    I think it is important to look farther than the surface and truly start to appreciate the work that is put into what is made.

I have a friend who makes the most gorgeous clothing, modern pieces and period correct recreations.  She matches fabric patterns along seams, fooling the eye into believing that the material is one continuous length.  All of her internal seams are folded back in on themselves with the raw edges completely encased and flush with the body of the fabric.  All gussets are hand turned so the points are seamless.  I could just go on and on about finished buttons, zippers, hand dyed fabric facing…. ah the beauty of it all.  Each piece is a true art form, a joy to look at on the hanger as well as the body. It’s almost a shame to store them in a closed closet away from view!

So of course I think of her often, and she inspires me on a regular basis!

Now I’d like to share a bit of seamstress knowledge with you.  It is important on all industrial sewn products, be it couch cushions or curtains, that all seams are reinforced.  Some people may think that this entails using heavy duty thread and possibly surging the seams.  This just causes the fabric to rip where the thread is holding the seam together.  You will still have a solid seam but there will be a hole right next to it.  You want to give the individual fibers in the fabric a little extra support against the pull.

You can do this one of two ways, there is the jean method of folding each piece of fabric over each other creating a box and sewing along each side.  Just look at your jeans to see an example.  Quite effective.  Another method, used for more delicate fabrics that fray easily is the french seam.  But not the one you recognize from soft chiffon shirts or skirts, this way is super supportive.

1.  place the wrong sides of your fabric together and surge them

2.  press the surged seam.

Left: surged seam. Right: encased surged seam.

3.  fold the fabric over so right sides are touching and the pressed surged seam is inside the fold.  Press with an iron, to hold the seam in place.

4.  With a regular straight stitch, sew a line 1 mm to the side of the surged edge.

5.  Press the encased seam. Checking to make sure that you did not accidenatally catch any of the surger thread in the seam.

This method traps all the loose threads creating a 4-5 thread internal barrier from being pulled out.  The folding over of the internal seam creates a mechanical retention for the fabric threads.  The second seam secures the mechanical retention while strengthening the original seam.  The chances of this pulling out or tearing the fabric is slim.  It’s perfect for any thin fabric that will suffer lots of abuse, pull, or twist.

Hope I shared some useful information!

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