How did you do that?

I love to share knowledge, give out little hints and tips to those who ask.  Recently I have had multiple emails asking how do I make all my up cycled items look amazingly new?

Up cycled clothing, items, and toys are a joy to make and a perfect addition to any household.  Contrary to popular belief, they do not need to look used, worn out, have holes, or stains to be up cycled     The point of up cycling is to give used items new life, not just reuse them.

First step:  Find some thing YOU LIKE, that draws your eye.  If you don’t like it why would anyone else?

Second step:  clean it, wash it, dry it, repair it (is there bead work that’s loose? fix it)

Third step: when possible cut along side the seams to get flat pieces of fabric.  If you cut along the seams this gives the edges of the fabric a smooth, unpuckered edge.  All industrial sewing machines cause visible needle holes in the fabric… not attractive.

If you are reconstructing an item using most of the original seams, such as jeans into a jean skirt, this is a good time to use a seam ripper instead of cutting the fabric. Just sew along the original seam holes when possible.

When reusing lace, avoid ripping the seam.  Just cut the fabric that it is attached to as close to the lace as possible.  If it is a large piece of lace (an adult bodice for example), try to use it as a full flat piece work with the existing seams instead of reinventing the wheel.

Fourth step: IRON YOUR FABRIC.  This step does two things for you; first it gives you a smooth field to work with and secondly it tells you if the former owner smoked.  No matter how many times you wash it, if you add heat to the fabric the smell of cigarette smoke will always be present.  If you are marketing your item as *smoke free*, this is a very important step.

Fifth step: when ever possible work your pattern pieces to exclude holes or worn spots in the fabric…. just turn those parts into rags.

Sixth and the most important, least known step:  Starch. Simple. As. That.

Either before or after you construct an item using your up cycled fabric, starch it.  (1 part clothing starch to approximately 5 parts water)  No biggie.  Use a fine spray and iron dry.  This helps the fabric hold it’s smoothness through shipping and wearing.

Now If you don’t want to use starch (allergies, or for newborns), use vinegar water when ironing.  The vinegar smell goes away as soon as the water has evaporated while ironing.

Viola, that’s how I do it.   The picture below is of the latest set of adult wings I have constructed, on the right hand side over-lapping the rows is the description of what each layer is.  Do they look up cycled to you? Or just plain beautiful?

partsofawing

Parts of a wing

Upcyled, recycled, brand spankin' new wings.

The times, they are a’changing.

adult wing set

Play time

It is always in those moments of deep stress, self doubt, loss, or adversity that people look for support in silly little idioms.   We’ve all heard them, and when times are going great we snort with derision.  But when it is our time to make it through the trough in life’s waves, they stand out.  Everyone has been told:  “the greatest journey, started with a single step” or “where one door closes, another one opens” or my *favorite* “Just let go, the universe has a plan for you”.  Seriously?  Do you honestly think the universe really gives a crap whether or not I am alive, let alone if I can pay my cable bill? Get my car fixed?  I am sorry but that is just a tad too egocentric for my tastes.   In my short life, patterns have become apparent.  As fully functioning adults we need to embrace the patterns and work with them.

With the birth of our daughter, not only did we become an amazing family, but she also gave me an outlet for my artistic creativity.  I have always loved making things, I believe that everyone is unique and has the right to express who they are.  I do it through my craft. I especially enjoy taking old items, I call them “finds”, dismantling them and giving them new life. Either as a toy, an accessory,  a household item, or even clothing.   Since my youth I always collected these “finds”, even today I have pieces I collected years ago… still waiting for their ultimate purpose!

The amazing thing is, there were people who loved my designs (especially those I made for my daughter) so much that they bought them.  Lots of them!  Of course this has added to the  inspiration.

As my daughter grows (we are now into year 2) she continues to inspire the items I focus on.  Does she like to play with cars? or is she more interested in silk scarves?  What is she choosing to wear?  What catches her eye?  Well, for right now there is no absolute answer to those questions.  She will put the silk scarves on her hot wheels and push them around the floor, or she will have 5 socks on one foot, a headband around her neck… and nothing else.  She will crawl into my fabric stashes and pull everything out, just to bury herself in the softness.  But one thing for sure, if I make it for someone else, she wants it.

But times are changing in our household.  We grow and expand, we all learn and move onto bigger and greater things.  Recently I was asked, “if no one bought a single thing more from you… would you still continue to make things? new designs?”  My clear and instant response is “emphatically, totally,  and undeniably: YES”.  I made things long before anyone considered to trade or purchase them from me, and I will be here long after my shop closes.  (Granted I hope that this is a long way off!)

DrossinMethod

Cyprus Dreams

I do not craft my art with intent to sell, I do not redesign to fill the shelves.  I construct works of beauty, because that is what I do.

I love the challenge.

I believe in expressing myself.

And I know there are other people out there that have the same aesthetics as I do.

I do not want to become the next one hit wonder, I do not want retail stores across the world.  What I love most is the pictures sent of other little boys and girls happily playing or wearing my designs.  I love having friends, family, and even complete strangers send me stuff and ask me “what can you make for me?”

So yes, times are a changing.  A few big changes in our household will effect my ability to turn items out at a quick rate.  But I know, those who love my work will understand that what they get is well made, from quality materials, and unlike what you find elsewhere.  Even if for the foreseeable future it will take a little longer.

You see, I accepted a new full time job.  Our daughter will be going to school with her father.  The studio will be a footnote in our lives for the time being.   But this also means that my need for an artistic outlet will be in even greater need.  So I hope you will enjoy all the new changes to my Etsy shop and facebook fan page, and will enjoy all the new designs that flow from my head into reality!  Even if they take a little longer to make an appearance.

Sad Birdie

Sad Birdie

The times are a’changing, and we are looking towards these new adventures with open arms!